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SEGA Systems

SG-1000

  •     Sega's first home console, created in an attempt to transition from the arcade game industry
  •     Also known as the Sega Computer Videogame SG-1000
  •     Plays ROM cartridges
  •     Computer version with a built-in keyboard which plays Sega Card games released as the SC-3000
  •     Not commercially successful, because of the number of consoles on the market already and the release of the Famicom by Nintendo on the same day

 

SG-1000 II

  •     Upgraded version of the SG-1000 with detachable controllers
  •     Can play Sega Card games in addition to ROM cartridges
  •     Computer version with a built-in keyboard which only plays Sega Card games released as the SC-3000H

 

Master System

 

  •     Sega's second major home console, released worldwide
  •     Initially released in Japan as the Sega Mark III, the third version of the SG-1000, before being redesigned and rebranded as the Master System
  •     Plays both Sega Card games and ROM cartridges
  •     Smaller and cheaper version of the console named the Master System II was released in 1990; it only plays ROM cartridges and sold poorly
  •     Unsuccessfully competed with the Nintendo Famicom in Japan and North America, but was commercially successful in Europe
  •     Still for sale in Brazil

Sega Genesis ( Mega Drive )

  •     Named the Mega Drive outside North America
  •     Sega's third major home console, after the SG-1000 and Master System; released worldwide
  •     Plays ROM cartridges
  •     A computer with an integrated Mega Drive was released in Japan as the Sega TeraDrive in 1991
  •     A smaller, lighter version of the console named the Genesis II was released in 1993
  •     The Genesis Nomad, a handheld version of the console that plays the same cartridges, released in 1995; an early version for use on Japanese airplanes was named the Mega Jet
  •     The Sega Meganet Internet service in Japan with the Mega Modem peripheral provided downloadable titles, some exclusive to the service, starting in 1990; it was replaced with the similar Sega Channel service in 1993
  •     Although the system was officially discontinued in 1997, third-party variants have been released around the world as recently as 2009
  •     Outsold by its main competitors Nintendo's Super Famicom and NEC's PC Engine in Japan, but was more successful in some other regions, such as the United States

Sega Saturn

  •     Sega's fourth major home console and only release in the 32-bit console generation, released worldwide
  •     Plays CD-ROM games
  •     Released simultaneously with the 32X, which also plays 32-bit games
  •     Sega NetLink accessory, released in 1996, provided Internet and multiplayer gaming access; in Japan it used the SegaNet Internet service
  •     Second version of the console codenamed Sega Pluto, with a built-in NetLink component, was planned but never released
  •     Considered a commercial failure; sold significantly fewer copies than its competitors the Sony PlayStation and Nintendo 64

Dreamcast

  •     Sega's fifth and final major home console and only major release in the sixth console generation, released worldwide
  •     Plays GD-ROM games
  •     Includes a built-in modem, which could connect to the SegaNet Internet service in Japan and North America and the Dreamarena service in Europe
  •     VMU accessory serves as a combination memory card, second screen, and simple handheld console
  •     Considered a commercial failure; sold significantly fewer copies than its main competitor the Sony PlayStation 2 because of a poor Japanese launch and lack of DVD support